Sue’s Other Writing

ppbkcroprugsmall

I published a novel decades ago with a “real” publisher, then wandered off to do a lot of other things. I resumed writing novels a few years ago and now I self-publish.

One of the best things about writing is my readers. The worst thing is self-promotion. For both these reasons, DDsE is free on this blog.

If you like DDsE, you might enjoy my other novels! (I’ve described them below in a DDsE context.) They’re not free, but I’m happy to gift e-copies – just leave me a comment, here or over on my all-purpose blog, Required Writing.

Some of my novels have kinship with DDsE:

FRAMES. Speculative detective fantasy series with much sarcasm and humor. If you squint at her right, narrator Nica could be a grown version of Ella. Also, some of FRAMES’ most important characters are cats. Nica appoints herself as a detective and, before she knows it, gets caught up in cases that take her to other dimensions where lawnchairs are sentient and books are mercenary killers. Books 1 and 2 are available:

 

Scar Jewelry – Literary fiction, drama with (as always) humor. This shares themes and attitude with DDsE. Narrator Deirdre, 20, takes life too seriously and wishes she could be more like twin brother Langston. Everything gets blown apart when their mother goes into a coma and the twins discover she has lied about – everything?! — from way back during her own teen years, in the early days of punk in Los Angeles.

scarjewelry.small

My other two novels are related to DDsE because I wrote them:

C.R.I.M.E. Science – Detective novella about a misfit oddball group of scientists and tech whizzes who investigate the death of a renowned volcano scientist. I want to continue this series with a new generation of detectives… after I finish DDsE and Frames.

CRIMESCIENCE_cover.little

Was It A Rat I Saw – Psychological thriller, originally published in hardcover by Bantam-Doubleday-Dell. A brain scientist uses her research to identify a killer after a test subject witnesses murder – with the half of his brain that no longer has access to language.

Print

Advertisements